Georgia Stathis is the owner of Starcycles, a faculty member at Kepler College and primary instructor for the Business & Finance Certificate in the Kepler Certificate Program.

The Planets and Their Positions in the Solar Return

What is the ascendant of the solar return?Where does its ruler lie in the solar return and in the natal?Is it on an angle?If so, then there is more action concerning the year and its activities.When you look at the solar return chart is it primarily angular, succedent, or cadent?What aspects are formed between the ruler of the solar return and the other planets?More challenging aspects, might suggest more challenge, and, actually more that gets done regarding that ruler.If they are supportive aspects, then things flow between the ruler of the solar return and the other planets.

The synodic return is a double outer planet transit measured by the time interval between the successive conjunctions of any two planets. If one outer planet moves to aspect a natal planet, angle or close network of planets, two at once marks a particularly important life period. Synodic returns look at the moving planets, not just their static position in the natal chart.

Now to look at contacts to the natal chart:

Relationship always implies some kind of exchange - minimally an exchange of air and in many cases emotions, fluids, and other substances. Folk traditions and wives' tales abound here, some seemingly well-grounded in reality as we know it. Regardless of the exchange involved, certain issues always merit analysis when we are asked to provide astrological input on comparisons or composites. Generally, people enter relationships because there is promise of some of their needs being met through the interaction. Any analysis must first determine each individual's needs as well as their ability to give in a relationship. To determine needs, look at the natal chart and pay special attention to the 3rd, 7th, and 11th, then the 8th, the Moon and Venus. Next compare what one offers that meets the other's needs - contacts to the Sun, Moon, North Node, ASC and DSC are the strongest indicators.

As we have another eclipse this Sunday, July 11, it seems a good time to consider the Moon's nodes. Astronomically, the nodes are the points where the Moon's orbit around the earth intersects the ecliptic, the apparent path of the Sun (and planets) around the Earth. Whether it is a north or south node is determined by whether the Moon's orbit is has crossed the ecliptic going toward the Northern or Southern Hemisphere. When this intersection of the Moon's orbit and the apparent path of the Sun and planets occurs during a new or full moon, we have an eclipse.

Astrologically, there are different schools of thought with regard to interpretation of the nodes. In general, traditional astrology treated the South node as malefic and the north node as tentatively benefic. Vedic astrologers in India do not like either one. Here are some early interpretations:


Warning: mysqli_close() [function.mysqli-close]: Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/kepler5/public_html/home/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 210