World Traditions

With the modern emphasis on natal astrology, natural astrology is sometimes forgotten. This is the branch of astrology that is more concerned with nature than with humans. Its traditional subject matter has been tides, weather and climate, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes, animal behaviors, agriculture, and plagues. This article gives a brief overview of natural astrology beginning with Ptolemy.

Instructor: Bruce Scofield.

10-week online class. Students will have a course site with course materials, discussion forums and more. Students will also meet once a week for an online conference to discuss the materials.

This course considers a range of astrological techniques that share a common principle – symmetry. Much of astrology is done using signs, houses and aspects which are essentially spatial, but do not necessarily involve symmetricality. The astrological chart itself is a grid on which planets are located in specific compartments, i.e. houses and signs. The planets can be shown to relate to each other by aspects based on the the division of the circle by various integers. In this way a delineation is produced. In this course we will consider only astrological techniques that are based on symmetry, which turns out to be quite a few.

The 20 day-signs in Mesoamerican astrology are similar in many ways to the Western zodiac. They map out distinct personality types and a sequence of evolutionary stages. There are a number of subtle, internal arrangements beyond the scope of this article that invite exploration by those interested in mathematical aesthetics.

Below are the names of the day-signs with a brief delineation for those born under them. The delineations are based partly on ancient sources and partly on anecdotal evidence.

The "Mayan Calendar" is the popular name for a complex organization of time, number, astronomy, and astrology created and employed by the Maya (and probably some of their predecessors) in ancient Mesoamerica (central and southern Mexico and northern Central America). Archaeologists and historians of Mesoamerican civilization generally refer to this calendar as the Long Count. The Long Count has three elements that are shared with the Western Christian calendar; a base date, a means of grouping large periods of time, and an astrological component.

The "Mayan Calendar" is the popular name for a complex organization of time, number, astronomy, and astrology created and employed by the Maya (and probably some of their predecessors) in ancient Mesoamerica (central and southern Mexico and northern Central America). Archaeologists and historians of Mesoamerican civilization generally refer to this calendar as the Long Count. The Long Count has three elements that are shared with the Western Christian calendar; a base date, a means of grouping large periods of time, and an astrological component.